Nanjing Night Net

Cries of ‘C’mon Aussie’ stir yobbo pride

IT IS drizzling and 5 degrees outside and we’re riding the metro to Copenhagen’s Bella Centre, the site of the summit on climate change. With two inflatable green-and-gold kangaroos under our arms, we are starting to wonder what we’re doing here.Getting up before dawn (which in Denmark is 8am), we thought we could pick up a pen and cardboard in time to arrive for the opening session of the day, placards in hand.Wrong! We are strangers in a strange land, and in this country there are no newsagents and everything seems to open at 10am or later. Two hours and no stationery shops later, we make do with cardboard salvaged from outside a Legoland megastore and textas from a toy shop.We arrive at the conference centre slightly frazzled and seriously behind schedule. Despite this, we find ourselves almost alone in protesting outside as delegates and observers join the 100-metre queue to enter the building.Taking a deep breath of frosty air, we overcome mild embarrassment to launch into our first round of “C’mon Aussie, c’mon, c’mon”. Spurred on by a few cheers from the queue, we sing with more gusto. In fact, it’s starting to feel a bit like we’re at the footy.We start interspersing the singing with a few shouts of “C’mon Australia, get a real target”.The yobbo pride is infectious, and you can pick the Aussies in the queue by their laconic smiles. The non-Australians are bemused, and we are constantly asked “what is KRudd?”, followed by the horrified question: “Is 5 per cent really your country’s target? What a joke!”We are asked who we are representing, and receive baffled looks as we explain we aren’t from any organisation, but are here off our own bat as concerned Australians.We are here to deliver a message to our government that its current climate policy is a global embarrassment.We are four young Australian friends hailing from Gladesville, the Blue Mountains, Glenorie and Kangaroo Valley, who would otherwise be spending our holidays on the beach and chilling at music festivals. This summer, we feel it’s more important to have what small effect we can on the negotiations that will decide our future.Inside the conference, the coal lobby is whispering in our delegation’s ears so it’s left to us to stand outside in the freezing cold singing “c’mon Kevin, c’mon”.Mithra Cox is an Australian who has travelled independently to Copenhagen.
Nanjing Night Net